Dashboard of the Month: Detect and React to Digital Campaigns

AdClarity’s New Campaigns Alert dashboard is basically a war-room tool allowing you to view the new digital activity of your competitors in different channels and markets. We also call it a Detect-and-React dashboard, since it helps you in detecting new digital activity, and then deciding the proper course of action.

The advantage of TV campaigns data is not obvious on digital media, as campaigns can appear on a countless number of publishers in many variations. Unlike TV or OOH campaigns, digital campaigns contain many call-to-action elements, that are also held by other distributors (retailers, e-commerce sites) that promote your products.

While most marketers are provided with a day-after data to TV campaigns, the long-tail of digital campaigns and their sources that make it almost impossible to track competitors’ activity in real time and choose whether the nest course of action is to respond with a counter promotion or campaign.

Moreover, digital campaigns may contain very important information. For example, they can give vital signals if a campaign is about to run on TV, or alternatively illuminate competitors’ promotional offerings. In some cases, you can even compare how distributors promote you and your competitors’ products.

Let us go over the process of detecting, analyzing and reacting to competitors’ activity.

From this point, we are inviting you to check the video below, explaining all 3 challenges or/and keep reading the article

 

To explore dashboards yourself, please follow The Link  

First Challenge – Detecting | How to view new digital activity on the local or global scale?

digital activity global local

What do I see? The number of new campaigns detected per territory (Country, US Market), and by the entity type – is signified by the campaign URL owned by the brand (Direct activity) or by the distributor (Indirect activity).

How could it help me? An overview of competitors’ activity. You can pinpoint the geographies that have increased activity, and determine if that activity derives from direct or indirect activity.

Second Challenge – Analyzing | What is my competitors’ direct and indirect strategy?

competitors strategy

What do I see? A comprehensive breakdown of new campaigns across channels to your left, and even more elaborate info on campaigns that are launching, including what are the active channels, you can determine whether it is it a branding or promotions campaign, and on how many publishers it was spotted. You can use the filters to determine the timeframe, with an option to only view only activity for certain brands and countries, and you can choose if you want to view distributors or direct activity. Clicking on each campaign name will redirect you to a top campaign creative and landing page view.

How could it help me? You can analyze how your competitors promote new products or on the verge of rebranding their existing products. The scope of publishers indicates if the campaign is small or relatively significant. You can also view what are the creatives and call-to-actions for a campaign that started running in parallel on traditional media.

Third Challenge – Reacting | How to respond effectively to competitors’ campaigns?

respond to competitors campaigns

What do I see? All activity for a certain territory. You can easily select the territories you are interested in to view in both direct and indirect activity.

How could it help me? After analyzing the commercial offerings, you have the tools to decide how to counteract better your competitors. You can launch your own campaign, adapt your forthcoming campaign to the new offering or encourage one of your distributors to promote a campaign. Either way, you can block your competitors’ major activity immediately with designated campaigns, or at least be aware of the activities made by your competitors.

 

In May, we will address how publishers can generate leads by viewing competing publishers’ activity on display and mobile.

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The Day Brands Will Follow Adidas and Ditch TV Advertising

In the scenario of brands leaving TV advertising, advertising agencies are expected to change their business model

Analysts once surmised that digital advertising would make TV advertising obsolete. Indeed, digital was growing massively over the past 2 decades, and it continues growing by borrowing the TV’s most important feature: Content. The more the digital medium grows, the more it disrupts interesting content on mobile, video and Over-The-Top (OTT) platforms. Relative to billboards and TV advertising, digital advertising also holds better measurement abilities and is significantly cheaper.

Although digital advertising is the only, highly growing medium in advertising, and despite analysts’ predictions, TV advertising spend is not declining but rather remains stagnant.

TV is still the most significant medium in terms of global ad spend, and advertising agencies are encouraging advertisers to maintain traditional advertising while providing comprehensive strategic and creative services.

Since agencies’ business model is based on media commission, they are becoming more digital-oriented to cope with brands’ digital needs on the one hand, but are still relying on TV spend as their major income source on the other hand.

Predictions about advertising are largely consensual, revolving around the speculation that TV is expected to remain stagnant, or slowly grow, while digital is expected to show an impressive growth. Eventually, digital advertising spend is not growing at the expense of TV advertising in a zero-sum manner.

However, broadcast TV channels do deal with zero-sum game issues, especially in markets where broadcast TV reached saturation. In such cases, more channels are competing on the same ratings’ pie and therefore lose income.

This trend even transcends to non-competitive markets with the penetration of Netflix, a long-tail of additional OTT services and the change in viewers’ habits. The Israeli market sets a great example, as reality TV hits such as The Voice and The Big Brother that once surpassed the 30% ratings average easily are far away from reaching it in 2017.

For reaching the same reach on TV, advertisers need to spend more up to a point it is becoming too expensive and somewhat ineffective. This logic may explain why Adidas has recently announced it ditches TV advertising and focuses on mobile advertising instead. In return, Adidas hopes to quadruple its earnings from e-commerce sales in the following 4 years.

Adidas takes an audacious, yet calculated, risk. However, such act holds 3 major consequences.

First, by ditching TV advertising Adidas also ditches its older target audience, while planning to compensate the future income loss with an increased e-commerce activity and lower point-of-sale expenses.

Second, Adidas is probably the only mega brand that declared it would stop using the TV medium. Although Global consumer goods corporations like P&G did allocate more for digital, they still advertise massively on TV. It is likely that after such crucial decision, other companies might take the same approach on the local and global scale.

Third, this act affects directly on advertising agencies’ business model. While Adidas is capable of buying digital media independently, it does rely on advertising agencies for strategic and creative services. In this new marketplace, agencies would fight on digital budgets and might even charge for their services, the same way consulting companies are charging their clients for billable hours.

Currently, Adidas remains a pioneer and other brands are yet to follow. However, if Adidas move indicates a new trend, we are expected to view an accelerated growth in the three growth engines of digital advertising — Mobile, Video and OTT.

The Transformation of Display Advertising

Not that long ago, Bill Cameron introduced the world to “the growing phenomenon that is the Internet.” While absurd to think about today, the introduction of the Internet and the simplification of connectivity was groundbreaking and not as well received as one would expect.

While many industries took the slow route on their journey to accepting Internet as a way of life, advertisers were some of the first to recognize the increased advertising space the Internet brought them.

The Early Days: Banners Ads

In 1993, Global Network Navigator (GNN), a project company of O’Reilly Media, realized that they could work directly with similar companies in order to promote products on their site for money – and so they became the first commercial publisher to offer display advertising in the form of direct partnerships.

Soon after offering the first advertisement to a local law firm, companies recognized that there was a new form of advertising in the making, and quickly jumped the direct partnership bandwagon, however it was HotWired which really changed the world of display advertising as we know it.

On October 27th, 1994, HotWired ran a delightfully cheese clickable ad with the simple words “Have you ever clicked your mouse right here? You will” on it and forever changed digital advertising. By setting aside dedicate space on their sites as commercial space and developing a new model based on clicks, HotWired effectively introduced the CTR model to advertisers – a move which quickly proved to be extremely profitable thanks to their reported 44% click through rate (Just a little perspective – today marketers consider anything in the double digits a unicorn).

The Growth Spurt: Ad Networks

After recognizing the potential to reach millions of users in the form of digital advertising, the idea that there should be a solution connecting the website owners with space to sell to the companies with products or services to advertise came up – and so ad networks were introduced.

In 1996, DoubleClick unveiled the first platform that did more than connect space sellers and buyers – it had the ability to track banner click through rates and impressions, giving key insight into their effectiveness while helping companies earn revenue and understand consumer behavior better. Beyond offering reporting capabilities and tracking banners, DoubleClick showed the world that advertisements are not as permanent in the new digital age. If formerly advertisers had to commit to a single campaign and run it on print ads and television, with DoubleClick, they could easily customize campaigns and change ads almost instantly, reducing wasted funds and improving segmentation and effectiveness of their campaigns.

The Rise of Google

Two guys by the names of Larry Page and Sergey Brin founded a little thing called Google in 1998, competing with the likes of AltaVista and Yahoo in the search engine space. Around that same time, Bill Gross invented the PPC model of advertising on his site GoTo.com. Recognizing that PPC was a way to monetize search engines and not just commercial sites, Google quickly sought a way to monetize their search engine and shortly after launching introduced AdWords.

Initially AdWords only offered CPM advertising, leaving them in the dust in terms of revenue when compared to GoTo (which became Overture when Yahoo purchased it for a whopping $1.63 billion). When Google revamped AdWords in 2002, they took a page from Bill Gross’ playbook and offered PPC advertising, as we know it today. Page and Brin understood that clicks played a part, but relevance to the search was what drove customer experience – suddenly companies had to pay big money to appear first, but they also had to be relevant to what the consumer was searching.

This simple understanding that consumers drive demand and not the other way around is what drives digital advertising today (and makes Google the undisputed search engine king and advertising conglomerate it is today).

The Social Media Revolution

In 2004 Facebook was launched as a platform to connect college students, yet the social network quickly took off as a platform extending beyond the confines of higher education. Just two years after foundation, on August 22nd 2006, Facebook announced the launch of their advertising module – a move that would have a profound impact on social media marketing and digital advertising as a whole.

Within a year Facebook developed the algorithms to enhance hyper segmentation based on the vast data it was able to accumulate on users, and from that point on, the only digital advertising that matters is the one that meets your exact target audience. By taking the “relevancy” criteria Google integrated with their PPC network, Facebook taught consumers and digital advertisers alike that consumers should only be shown target ads based on their specific likes and behavioral patterns. Other social media sites such as Twitter, YouTube and even Google+ quickly fell in line, quickly catapaulting the impact of social media on the world of digital advertising.

Where will digital advertising go?

 As consumers are increasingly aware of display advertisements and competition heightened by availability and easy access, companies have to improve their creative campaigns and digital strategy in order to appeal to consumers and gain the coveted clicks and conversions. To do this, many digital advertisers are turning to competitive analysis tools (such as our very own AdClarity) to gain valuable insight about competitors and leverage the results similar companies achieved in order to improve ROI and maximize customer conversion.

In the future, digital advertisers will have to continually focus on the competition while trying to balance the ever-so-delicate line between content and advertisement, as consumers want more and more relevant content that feels less and less like an advertisement.

Top 3 Video Advertising Trends for 2017

It’s 2017 – the undisputed year of the video! Since emerging as a major player in the digital advertising world, video advertising has only risen in popularity among consumers, and as a result, has risen in important among digital advertisers and marketers.

Today, digital ad spending for video is catching up with social advertising and has already exceeded display advertising. As 2017 rolls in, eMarketer predicts that video advertising will narrow the gap with social advertising and continue to withhold market share for display advertising, reaching a total spend of $13.59 billion.

So what can digital advertisers expect to see in 2017 where video is concerned?

More integration with social media

As social advertising increases, video advertising on social media sites will undoubtedly continue to increase. Facebook is already dominating the video sponsored posts and ads, and other social sites such as Pintrest and Twitter have already rolled out or discussed the future roll out of video advertising abilities.

More feelings – less words

Due to the unique nature of video ad consumptions, there is an increased need to relay powerful messages in shorter times than ever with fewer words than ever. Marketing as a whole has always relied on the invoking of emotions to drive results, and the introduction of video advertising only heightens the ability of digital advertisers to invoke emotion to drive action by consumers – all while saying less and showing more.

More mobile campaigns

For years video and animation on mobile devices featured limited functionality and suffered from delays and all around poor customer experience. With innovation in technology and increased use of smartphones, that is no longer an issues. Mobile consumption is on the rise and so it is only natural that video digital advertising on mobile devices will be the next big thing to look out for in 2017!

Top Digital Advertising Trends for 2017

It’s that time of the year again! Xmas and New Year Holidays are over  and new 2017 promises to bring many changes to digital advertising world.

As a leading digital advertising BI solution, our goal is to help our clients stay ahead of the game – and sometimes that means giving you the tips and insights of our top researchers into what they think the top digital advertising trends of 2017 will be:

  1. Video Consumption is slowing down – don’t stop your video campaigns just yet, but reconsider where you publish them instead. While video consumption is expected to go down on desktop, eMarketer reassures us that mobile consumption is still going up.
  1. Social Media is Strengthening for eCommerce – with more and more tools coming from social media sites (think paid Instagram campaigns through the Facebook and new features on Twitter), eCommerce is going to see a big boost in 2017 as campaigns in social are geared towards conversion.
  1. The Pokemon Effect – pushed by the successful immersion of augmented reality thanks to Pokemon Go, 2017 is expected to see an increase in the use of augmented reality, specifically in mobile marketing. With over 500 million downloads and 20 million daily active users, one thing is sure – consumers love augmented reality!
  1. Better Data Visualization – after the rise of info graphics a few years ago, it makes perfect sense that marketers would want more solutions for data visualization to improve digital marketing campaigns. How do we know? We’re speaking from experience! BIScience just launched a brand new Ad-Intelligence visualization solution and its getting great reviews from digital marketers across all sides of the marketing funnel maximizing the tool to understand competitive analysis on a whole new level– want to learn more? Click here!
  1. Live Stream Everything – if the presidential debates were live streamed, digital marketers need to understand that the idea of live video is so immersed in modern society, that brands that do not utilize it as part of their digital advertising strategy risk losing market share and relevance in the eyes of modern consumers.

The Evolution of Programmatic Buying: Top Obstacles in Programmatic Advertising

In today’s day and age, it seems that programmatic advertising is everything. Despite being a relatively new tool for digital advertisers, it has increased in popularity rapidly due to the improved results advertisers can get from hyper targeting and modifying bids in real time without the need for manual involvement.

Despite the dependency on programmatic advertising, there is still a great deal of challenges that digital advertisers find themselves dealing with.

The Danger of Bots

One of the most notable obstacles that programmatic advertisers have to deal with is the presence of bots on the internet. It is believed that almost 50% of the web is comprised of bots, and an overwhelming majority of them are considered ‘bad bots’ that skew advertising results, impersonate humans and increase the prevalence of spam.

Viewability Fraud

One of the most common obstacles bots cause is in the viewability results displayed to digital advertisers. Ad Fraud, especially due to viewability issues, is such a concern that companies such as Google and AppNexus have premium services guaranteeing “fraud free” ads for advertisers. Despite this solution, the problem is still a difficult one for digital advertisers, especially those seeking non-traditional advertising ad networks to use for their campaigns.

Time to create creatives

An interesting obstacle that digital advertisers have had to deal with is the inability to make enough creative to test as quickly as programmatic tools can accept them. To combat this, many programmatic creative tools have been created, yet their use is one advertisers are slow to integrate into their workflow.

Ultimately, the biggest concern digital advertisers have to deal with is the lack of understanding of programmatic and the newness of the technology.

 

 

Three Tips To Keep Brand Identity Among Holiday Frenzy

Part of your efforts as a digital marketer are to uphold the brand identity guidelines of your company – a task that is much harder to perform around the holidays when everything around us is recolored to match the season.

There is no easy answer, but there are a few things you can do in order to ensure that your campaigns stay true to your brand.

Tip 1: Remember Your Identity 

 The most obvious tip is to remember your brand identity and what it stands for. It is absolutely ok to change and adapt for the holiday, but do not go to far out from your brand identity or you risk alienating your existing customers who are loyal to a particular brand.  Consider adding light ‘holiday flair’ if you cannot integrate new colors without damaging your brand integrity.

Tip 2: Own Your Holiday Spirit

If you decide to change some aspect of your branding and colors for the holiday – own it! Remember when starbucks changed their cups to red and the internet freaked out? They didn’t apologize, merely explained their action (and got a whole lot of great press along the way). Go into the holiday season strong and you will come out strong!

Tip 3: Remember your Audience

 Want to promote a Christmas special but your audience is predominantly Jewish? Love Kwanza colors but targeting Christian audiences? It’s important to know your audience and respect their holiday spirit when considering holiday campaigns.

Extra tip: Enjoy the holiday season! It is all about family and happiness and that is what is important at the end of the day!

Seasons greetings from all of us at Adclarity by BIScience!

Why Black Friday Advertising Starts On A Wednesday

Every year around the Fall and Winter holidays, our minds turn onto shopping mode. With so many events coming up and so much love to give, we must make sure that we budget ourselves and do our home and gift shopping in advance to prepare for a smooth holiday season! While many people choose to start their shopping as early as September or October, and some choose to wait until the days leading up to the big holidays, the most average time of year to begin our holiday shopping is the end of November and beginning of December. This shopping season, full of sales and shopping treats, is (un)officially marked by a commercial dream come true called Black Friday.

What is Black Friday Anyways?!

Black Friday is, for all intents and purposes, the Friday after Thanksgiving Thursday. Over the past decades, this day is filled with door-buster sales and early bird specials in almost every store out there competing to attract customers and loyal consumers. Bargain hunters are especially jolly during Black Friday for a very good reason – since this day is known as a day for bargain sales, Black Friday is almost always the biggest sale day of the entire year, with unbeatable markdowns that people simply will not find again during any other sale day. Why is it called BLACK Friday? For that reason exactly! Retailers report such high profits that their businesses gain and gain. With gains traditionally marked in black and losses in red, this profitable day therefore lets businesses enjoy seeing a whole lot of black on their records! Exciting!

Leading up to Black Friday…

You would think that Black Friday sales would only start being discussed and highlighted on the days or weeks leading up to Black Friday itself, but don’t be surprised if you see advertisements creeping earlier and earlier! Black Friday is a great day for businesses AND consumers, but keep in mind the gruesome pressure businesses feel to compete with one another for customers! In order to ensure that their brand will have a successful Black Friday, businesses work very hard on creating successful advertising campaigns. While sales advertisements are traditionally announced on Thanksgiving Day, these campaigns can begin as early as October, and although that sounds almost too early, it reaps great results. Since so many shoppers like to plan their shopping early so that they can budget well and make their purchases slowly, advertising Black Friday early allows these shoppers to keep Black Friday sales for specific stores in mind when planning their holiday gifts.

Black Friday on a Wednesday?

With advertising creeping earlier and earlier and the competition getting more and more intense, it was only a matter of time before the shopping times themselves were leveraged to boost sales! That’s right – Black Friday is no longer limited to FRIDAY! In fact, the year 2013 began a trend where stores opened their doors for Black Friday customers on Thanksgiving Day or even on the Wednesday prior. While this is somewhat controversial due to the employees that must work during these days, the earlier opening time both gives customers more time to shop and businesses more time to SELL, thereby boosting their sales and overall profits.

If Black Friday Advertising Starts on a Wednesday, When Does It End?!

We know, we know. It’s a little confusing that Black FRIDAY actually begins as early as WEDNESDAY… but that might help lessen the shock when we hear that it lasts way longer than Friday sometimes too! In order to give customers all the time they need and sell, sell, sell, some stores will open their Black Friday deals late into the weekend. While this is true, don’t wait to long to go out to make your purchases! Inventories run out quickly this time of year!

From In-Stores to Online…

Traditionally, Black Friday was for in-store shopping. When cyber-shopping rose in popularity, businesses created a Cyber Monday in order to lessen competition between the two modes of shopping. The more time goes by, however, the more these lines blend together. While Cyber Monday will have the best of the online deals, keep in mind that many stores now open their cyber sales alongside their in-store sales!

Tips for Black Friday Shopping!

For the best Black Friday shopping experience, consider these tips:

  • Plan ahead! Decide what you want in advance and try to plan your purchases according to timing out the best deals.
  • If you’re deciding between big ticket items and smaller items, stick with the big ticket items! Black Friday deals give a bigger advantage to big purchases. It’s better to save big with 20% off a $200 item ($40!) than save small with 50% off a $20 item ($10).
  • Check deals for the same items from different stores. If you prefer one store over another, see if they have price matching policies!
  • Buy only what you know you need or want! Returns from Black Friday sales are often problematic due to the big sale nature of the deals.

HAPPY BLACK FRIDAY!      

How Brands Promote Seasonal Sales

Seasonal sales generate some of the biggest revenue seasons of the year for the majority of sales-focused companies around the world. While we can trust that the holidays will increase sales on their own, the most successful companies are the ones that thoroughly prepare for holiday seasons and market their products well. In order to ensure that your brand does well this holiday season (despite any unforeseen fluctuation in weather or current events), keep in mind these major tips for taking advantage of seasonal promotions.

Develop a good campaign strategy

Make sure to create a structured campaign so that things don’t fall into a frenzy during the holidays. As simple as this sounds, it is absolutely important to plan, and stick to your plan!

Stay up to date on product data

When it comes time for the season itself, make sure to stay up to date on information such as stock availability and delivery times to ensure easy transactions and happy customers!

Consider the “feel-good” factor

While it seems counter-intuitive, integrating a charitable factor in your sales can often increase sales by allowing customers to feel as though they are giving back with their purchases. Take advantage of charitable events such as Breast Cancer Awareness month to do good and increase revenue all at the same time.

Use last year’s data to better this year’s sales

By carefully examining the success of your campaigns from previous years, you can make changes to either continue positive responses or fix small falters to optimize your campaigns and your sales opportunities.

Avoid ad copy and be innovative!

Even if your campaign was a huge success last year, avoid recycling advertisements. A big part of your campaign should be encouraging past customers to return, and so new advertisements give the best chance to revitalize interest and promote customer loyalty.

Be sensitive to marketing trends and channels

Marketing seems to be always on the go! Make sure to stay up to date with trends and channels to take advantage of, such as mobile marketing, native advertising, and social media advertising.

Remember that seasonal goes beyond Easter and Christmas

While Christmas is definitely the most profitable holiday, there are numerous events and occasions to take advantage off and generate revenue with sale campaigns. This can be anything from Valentine’s Day to National Sports Week! If you pay attention to the smaller occasions and stay on top of your marketing towards these ends, every month can generate seasonal revenue.

Advertise early!!!

Many holiday shoppers are financially minded and prefer to do their holiday shopping in advance so to ease the financial strain of the holiday season. For these customers especially, an early campaign makes all the difference! The earlier you advertise, the sooner your product in on the minds of your consumers.

Is Every Campaign a Back-To-School Campaign?

Does it seem like every campaign lately is a back to school campaign? You’re not imagining it – marketers, especially digital advertisers, have shifted their campaigns to leverage the rise of back-to-school shopping, and the result is that almost any campaign online these days is a back-to-school sale.

As parents across the country rejoice at the start of the new school year and struggle to adjust their kids back to the known routine, digital advertisers across the country are eagerly prepping back to school sales in the hopes of maximizing revenue and increasing brand awareness and loyalty.

While the school year only officially opened now, back-to-school campaigns have been spotted online as early as July 11th – almost a week later from the previous year and a month later than 2014. The shift in launch of back to school campaigns is likely due to the fact that digital advertisers want to create a sense of urgency – something that can’t be done two almost two months before the start of the new school year – while bringing a much needed boost to sales after disappointing holiday seasons and summer shopping.

In the past, back-to-school campaigns were largely focused on in-store purchases, however a recent study by the National Retail Federation reveled that online back-to-school shopping is increasing in popularity, with over 34% of parents reporting that they will make their purchases online this year.  The study further indicated that of those making their purchases online, 2 out of 3 parents would buy more than what was required of them on the school supply list – this is perhaps the largest reason that brands that operate outside of the back-to-school sphere have bumped up their digital advertising campaigns and found a way to connect their product to back-to-school needs of families.

As digital advertising is increasingly focused on mobile devices, it should come as no surprise that this year, more and more parents will make their back to school purchases directly from their mobile phones. The Rubicon Project back to school survey revealed that 60% of parents plan on purchasing as least one item on their mobile devices, and 30% reported that over a fourth of their purchases will be made on mobile devices.

Considering the increased reliance on digital devices for back to school shopping, coupled with the latest news from eMarketer that back-to-school sales are expected to go up by 2.6% this year in comparison to 2015, it’s no wonder that digital advertisers are doing all they can to leverage this latest shopping season to increase sales and maximize revenue generation.